Germany off the beaten track

The Krämerbrücke (Merchants´ Bridge) is the longest bridge of its kind in Europe to be entirely built over with houses. © HHoG/ Takano

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Erfurt

Architecural Treasures

/assetimage_830_240w182.jpgErfurt became a pilgrimage destination of sorts with the reunification of Germany. Thousands of travelers poured into this former East German city to see where Martin Luther studied, to bow heads where he prayed, to walk the same medieval streets, and even to sleep where he slept. But there is far more to this city than Luther, particularly when it comes to masterpieces of medieval architecture, and the compact Old Town makes for easy exploration of the many neighboring historic sights.

Erfurt’s landmark is the unique ensemble of both the Dom St. Marien (St Mary's Cathedral) and the Severikirche (St Severus Church) that majestically dominate the cityscape. These architectural masterpieces of German Gothic style are imposing examples of the art of church architecture. Erfurt became one of the richest cities of the Middle Ages thanks to the woad plant, which provided the primary source of blue dye for textiles.

In more recent times, this beautiful city has bloomed into the reputation of Europe’s "Flower City", and a visit in springtime is a delight for the senses. A city of parks and gardens, it boasts Germany’s largest flower bed (6,000 square meters) in the ega-Park. The egapark impresses visitors with its fascinating plant life and the architectural design of gardens.

Erfurt Town Hall

Woad Storehouses

Prediger Church

Petersberg Citadel and St. Peter´s Church, Erfurt

Old Synagogue

Church of St. Severus

St Mary's Cathedral and St Severus Church, Erfurt

Merchants' Bridge

egapark - Erfurt Horticultural Exhibition Center

Cathedral Square

Blackfriar's Church

Augustinian Monastery

Map of Germany


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Top Tip: Blue-printing

Until the 17th century the blue “Färberwaid” plant was the most important textile colorant. Nowadays travelers can still buy handmade blue-printing products here.